Players will find it difficult when football resumes states former Premier League defender

Tuesday, March 24th, 2020 1:52pm

Former Premier League defender and current assistant coach to the Canadian national side, Steven Caldwell has spoken about the difficulties players will be facing right now amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

The thrills which come from hearing the referee blow their whistle, seeing your side find the back of the net or belting out a chant on the terraces, and the agony when you come away from a game shaking your head asking how you lost that game, it's what makes football the beautiful game. 

However the pain of no football is not just felt in the stands, but also by those on the pitch.

Footballers across the world are having to stay away from their workplace and many have taken to social media showing off what they are doing during their days at home. 

Some are playing pranks on their loved ones, some are showing off their dancing skills whilst others complete 'the loo roll challenge'!

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Amongst trying to remain upbeat and bringing some needed entertainment and cheer to the public, footballers are continuing to train even though the sport has been postponed for the foreseeable future. Professional football in England has been suspended until April 30th at the earliest, so this could be pushed further back if deemed necessary. 

Speaking to Andy Hodgson on Love Sport Radio, former Wigan, Newcastle and Burnley defender Steven Caldwell, who is now assistant coach for the Canadian national side, was asked what the sport will look like once the season resumes and how this break has impacted players.

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"I think when we get back to football, whenever that may be, it's going to look very much like pre-season football and it's going to be at obviously the business end of the season when trophies are getting handed out so that will be weird. 

"You expect the best teams to be flying along at this point but everybody is going to be back to square one. I think in the mean time for these guys, who like I say that are extremely fit, and hopefully not too many of them can contract the virus, but even if they do they're probably going to be healthy enough to fight it. 

"But it's the mental health side of things. It's you know the fact that they're on their own... most of the guys are staying alone in two bedroom apartments, it's small, it's tight and they're used to going in and congregating with their teammates and training together and pushing towards a common goal. 

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"Most of them are away from their family, most of them are young guys and you know they're from the US or from wherever in the world and there's going to be serious mental health implications in my opinion for most football players all over the world just because of the the nature of the business of what we do. 

"[Clubs have] given the guys every resource possible to stay fit but how is that like going out there on the grass or doing things properly? They're definitely going to drop in fitness and they're going to find it difficult to get up and running if and when this season begins again."

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